Heron Court Congregational Church, Rugeley

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Date:1915 - 1920 (c.)

Description:This postcard view of the Heron Court Congregational Church also captures a glimpse of Heron Court Mansion on the right. The Mansion was built in 1851 by Joseph Robert Whitgreave as his residence. In 1861 he built the coach house and stables and he was one of the founders along with his sister Etheldreda of the nearby Roman Catholic Church in 1849-50.

In 1871 a portion of the mansion was sold to the Elmore Street Congregational Church. The west side of the mansion was demolished to build the Heron Court Congregational Church in 1874 and a Sunday school room in 1896. Both of these were demolished in the 1970s due to subsidence.

In 1901 the Sisters of the Christian Retreat opened St. Anthony's Convent at Heron's Nest, Heron Street, and later to accommodate members of the order who had been expelled from France the Convent moved to the remainder of the mansion on 31 July 1904. Heron Court was then used as a Christian retreat and teaching centre. In the 1960s the mansion became home to Rugeley Billiards Club, later known as Rugeley Snooker Club and over the years many local businesses and clubs have also made use of the premises.

The coach house and stables were purchased by the Board of health in 1886 and they served as the local Fire Station for a while and also by Rugeley Urban District Council’s as a ‘Works Depot’. These buildings were demolished in 1990 and housing known as ‘Forge Mews’ built on the site.

Acknowledgement: H Thornton and Ironworks of the Rising Brook Valley at “Cannock Wood” and also the Rugeley Snooker Club.

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Creators: Miss Dorothy Roberts - Contributor

Donor ref:BM-DR-61 (192/35662)

Source: Mr Bob Metcalfe

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